About Harald Blomberg M.D.

boyDr. Harald Blomberg received his doctorate in medicine in Sweden in 1971. He decided to enter into the field of child psychiatry. In 1975 he became part of a group of scientists studying Soviet psychology and psychiatry, which culminated in numerous published articles and a book on his experiences. Soon after, Dr. Blomberg started his specialist training in general psychiatry which was completed in 1982 and which led him on his journey to Blomberg Rhythmic Movement Training®.

In 1984 Dr. Blomberg joined a two year training program in clinical hypnosis. Among the teachers were several prominent clinical hypnotists from UK and the USA . Peter Blythe, the founder of The Institute of Neuro-Physiological Psychology (INPP) was one of the principal teachers of hypnosis. Besides courses in hypnosis, Dr. Blomberg attended a course in primitive reflexes and learning disabilities.

In 1985 Dr. Blomberg was introduced to Kerstin Linde, a body therapist. She was working with rhythmic movements inspired by the movements infants do before they learn to walk. She had very successfully treated children and grown-ups with severe neurological and developmental challenges, as well as, physical handicaps. When Dr. Blomberg met her he wanted to do something about his own motor difficulties caused by polio in his childhood. Her treatment method had a very strong impact on Dr. Blomberg and he asked to sit in on her treatments, which she generously allowed. He especially followed her work with children who suffered from neurological handicaps such as cerebral palsy and saw the many improvements that contradicted all his medical education and experience. He also followed her work with Alzheimer’s patients and people with psychosis and other psychological and emotional disturbances. Being stunned by the positive effects of her treatment, Dr. Blomberg decided to write a book about her treatment method and started to interview parents of handicapped children who were treated by Kerstin Linde.

By 1982 Dr. Blomberg had finished his specialist training and started to work as a psychiatric consultant at a psychiatric out-patient clinic. In 1986 he introduced the rhythmic movements of Kerstin Linde at his clinic both for neurotic and psychotic patients, with excellent results. They even noted amazing recovery in some cases of protracted schizophrenia.

In 1989 Dr. Blomberg started private practice and a colleague invited him to introduce the movement training for some severely ill chronic schizophrenic patients, most of them hospitalized for ten years or more at the psychiatric hospital where he worked. After two years a report about this work was compiled. Reviewers of this report found that “the study indicates that the patients treated with movement therapy had displayed the greatest positive changes…Among other things the changes manifested themselves in the fact that these patients to a greater extent were able to take part of social activities, participate in occupational therapy and their daily tasks in the ward. They had also become more interested in their surroundings”.

Dr. Blomberg introduced the Rhythmic Movement Training at an anthroposophic school for students with developmental and intellectual disabilities. Some of the students had specific intellectual disabilities, and others were diagnosed with autism or ADD. They found that students with movement disabilities, with learning disabilities due to ADD, and with psychosis are the ones that benefit the most from the Rhythmic Movement Training.  He advised that those with autism also needed to heal the “gut flora”, many with a gluten and casein free diet in order to avoid unnecessary emotional reactions.

Today, under the direction of Dr. Harald Blomberg, the Center for Rhythmic Movement Training is a clinic in operation in Solna, Sweden.  Here children and adults are assessed and seen for a variety of challenges, including sensory and motor problems, ADHD, dyslexia, language disorders, delayed language development, Aspergers, Autism, Cerebral Palsy and Parkinson.  Under the direction of the center’s skilled therapists, each client receives an individualized exercise program and attends private therapy sessions.  Some therapy is continued at home individually or with the parent.

Since 1990 Dr. Blomberg has given many lectures and courses in Rhythmic Movement Training for therapists, teachers and nursing staff. After the publication of his first book, these courses increased in demand. During the following years he gave courses frequently and regularly. The emphasis of these courses has been on treating children with dyslexia, ADHD and motor problems.

Dr. Harald Blomberg wrote the first three comprehensive manuals of Rhythmic Movement Training: 1. Rhythmic Movement Training and Primitive Reflexes in ADHD, 2. Rhythmic Movement Training and the Limbic System and 3. Rhythmic Movement Training in Dyslexia. These manuals principally dealt with rhythmic movements as taught by Kerstin Linde, but also included information about primitive reflexes and how they could be integrated both by rhythmic exercises and by isometric exercises taught by Svetlana Masgutova.

Dr. Blomberg, to date, teaches courses frequently and regularly both in Sweden and throughout Europe, as well as, abroad: The United States, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Australia, Japan.

In 2008 Dr. Blomberg published his book, Movements that Heal (published in English 2011). This book caused an increasing demand for courses and the clinical work.

The Rhythmic Movement Method: A Revolutionary Approach to Improved Health and Well-Being (2015) explains how RMT helps children with ADHD and adults suffering from depression, psychosis, Parkinson’s disease, and other disorders to feel well, function better, and stop taking medications.

A third book, Autism: A Path To Healing: A Holistic View on Autism, Environmental Factors, Diet and Rhythmic Movement Training (2106) deals with the environmental causes of autism and treatment of autism with diet, food supplements and Rhythmic Movement Training, among many other things.